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"After her husband loses his memory in a serious car accident, a headstrong young woman struggles to recover her life with a man who now sees her as a stranger."

Jenna is happily married and in love with her husband Ryan,  but her life crumbles when Ryan is hospitalized from a serious car accident. Tragically, Ryan loses his memory, including that of his life with her. When Ryan is sent home to recuperate, Jenna desperately tries to reconnect with her bewildered and confused husband, only to be rejected time and time again as if she were a stranger. As she struggles day by day to find tiniest glimmers of hope, the pain of loss starts to take its toll.
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I’ve always been fascinated with the concept of loss. When you think about the word, you automatically think about the permanent and absolute forms of loss, like death, or a breakup. Loss is never easy to deal with, but what happens if, instead of losing someone’s presence in your life, the person you’ve lost is sitting right opposite of you? What do you do then? How do you move on?

 

I first wanted to tell this particular story because from 2011 to 2017, my father was suffering from depression. A strange, unexplainable physical side effect of this was that he would get seizures, followed immediately by a few minutes of complete memory loss. I first experienced this when I was alone with him, and I was terrified—of what this would mean to him and his career, and of what it would mean to me as his daughter, if he never remembered anything.

 

For the next several years, I watched him becoming so focused on what was wrong with himself that he became detached from his environment, which included my mother and myself. I also had to watch my mother try to save a man who suddenly felt like a stranger living in our home. No matter how hard it was for her, she never gave up on him. When he finally recovered, I came to realize then that love isn’t just a feeling, but a choice, a commitment.

 

As a filmmaker, I love using minimum dialogue and letting the audiovisual components take their effects on the audience. The dialogues that existed in the script kept getting cut down through the principal photography and in the editing room. Emotions were communicated mostly through the actors’ performances and how we chose to photograph them, and sound design elements are mostly non-diagetic to enhance the silence between the estranged couple.

DIRECTOR'S STATEMENT